Video- Jewisn Confederates

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Video is  From Old Virginia Blog Here is more from the Richmond Times Dispatch

A year after the Civil War ended, Richmond’s Jewish women came together to honor and mourn their own:

Marx Myers, killed at Manassas; Henry Smith, at Fayette Courthouse; Herman Hirsh, in Westmoreland County; Isaac Levy and Gustavus Kann, at Petersburg; Madison Marcus, Henrico County; and 30 other Jewish Confederates from around the South, dead in the defenses of Richmond.

The local men were buried in family plots around Hebrew Cemetery on Shockoe Hill.

Others shared a plot known as the soldiers’ section. Caring for them became the goal of the Hebrew Ladies’ Memorial Association. And in a fundraising letter “to the Israelites of the South” on June 5, 1866, Mrs. Abraham Levy explained that the group intended to place a headstone at each grave and erect a monument to their service.

“In time to come, when our grief shall have become, in a measure, silenced, and when the malicious tongue of slander, ever so ready to assail Israel, shall be raised against us, then, with a feeling of mournful pride, will we point to this monument and say: ‘There is our reply.'”

That reply, bordered by an elaborate iron fence with draped muskets and crossed sabers, remains standing in Richmond, a testament to the service of Jews during the Civil War.

North and South, Jews were very much a part of the wartime response.

They were soldiers and blockade runners, merchants and calligraphers, public leaders and farmers. They died in battle, came home wounded, tended to the sick. Families tore apart as they chose sides. Tales of bravery and heartache lived for generations.

  • Judah Benjamin, sometimes known as “the brains of the Confederacy,” was one of the South’s highest-ranking officials. He served as attorney general, secretary of war and finally secretary of state during the four years that the Confederate capital was in Richmond.
  • Myer Angle, first president of Congregation Beth Ahabah, had six sons who fought for the Confederacy.
  • Phoebe Pember tended the sick and wounded as chief matron at Chimborazo military hospital, where as many as 75,000 were treated during the war.
  • Gustavus Myers, city councilman for 28 years and council president for 12, was one of the men who met with President Abraham Lincoln on a surprise visit to Richmond on April 4, 1865, to talk about an oath of allegiance for former Confederates.

“The President declared his disposition to be lenient towards all persons, however prominent, who had taken part in the struggle, and certainly no exhibition was made by him of any feeling of vindictiveness or of exultation,” Myers wrote in a memorandum the next day.

An estimated 7,000 Jewish Americans served as soldiers for both sides in the American Civil War, possibly 2,000 of them Confederates. Richmond counted 102 Jewish men fighting for secession.

When M.J. Michelbacher, Beth Ahabah’s spiritual leader, requested furloughs for Jewish soldiers on the high holidays, Confederate Inspector General Samuel Cooper said there were so many Jews in the Confederate forces that it would be impossible to give blanket permission for all to leave at once.

The first Jewish person recorded in Richmond was Isaiah Isaacs, who was involved in a suit in 1769 in Henrico County Court. In 1788, Isaacs was elected to Richmond’s Common Hall, the forerunner of city council. He was a founder of Beth Shalome, Richmond’s first synagogue on Mayo Street, where Interstate 95 crosses Shockoe Valley. He owned four house slaves, but freed them at his death. 

Much more at the link!

 

150 years ago, the man and the moment met

150 years ago, as of February 10th, Jefferson Davis was elected to be the first, and as it turned out, the only President of the Confederate Sates of America

MONTGOMERY, Alabama — Today marks the anniversary of the election of Jefferson Davis as provisional president of the Confederate States of America at a congress held in Montgomery.

Davis was later inaugurated on Feb. 18, a date that will soon be celebrated by the Sons of Confederate Veterans on Feb. 19 with their Confederate Heritage Rally 2011 at the Alabama State Capitol at noon.

The event plans to commemorate the founding of the CSA, the inauguration of Davis and the raising of the first Confederate Flag and will involve re-enactments, cannon fire and speeches.

Newspapers throughout the state and country are taking a look back into the history of the Confederacy, some offering a simple glimpse into the past while others question whether or not the anniversary should be celebrated at all.

The Montgomery Advertiser talks to residents of the “birthplace of the Confederacy,” finding disagreements on what caused the Civil War and whether it is an event worthy of honor or shame. Some residents believe it is a part of United States history no matter what while others do not see any reason to celebrate it at all.

Washington Post columnist Dennis Frye peeks into how Davis personified the American leader of the mid-19th century, saying the seceded states needed his experience as a politician and president. But Frye concludes Davis ultimately couldn’t control the advocates of states rights in his own confederacy of states.

New York Times columnist Adam Goodheart recounts in detail when Davis left the U.S. Senate to secede from the Union, depicting how one Southern senator after another rose to declaim his valedictory address. Goodheart illustrates how an ill Davis explained why his state seceded.