Montgomery writer bashes Southerners for commemorating history

By Doug Hagin, Camp Commander

Here is my podcast response to a column by Josh Moon  which you can read here

Read it, and then consider my response to his ignorant, and hateful attack of not only our ancestors, but teaching history as well.

Listen to my podcast here!

Advertisements

150 years ago, the man and the moment met

150 years ago, as of February 10th, Jefferson Davis was elected to be the first, and as it turned out, the only President of the Confederate Sates of America

MONTGOMERY, Alabama — Today marks the anniversary of the election of Jefferson Davis as provisional president of the Confederate States of America at a congress held in Montgomery.

Davis was later inaugurated on Feb. 18, a date that will soon be celebrated by the Sons of Confederate Veterans on Feb. 19 with their Confederate Heritage Rally 2011 at the Alabama State Capitol at noon.

The event plans to commemorate the founding of the CSA, the inauguration of Davis and the raising of the first Confederate Flag and will involve re-enactments, cannon fire and speeches.

Newspapers throughout the state and country are taking a look back into the history of the Confederacy, some offering a simple glimpse into the past while others question whether or not the anniversary should be celebrated at all.

The Montgomery Advertiser talks to residents of the “birthplace of the Confederacy,” finding disagreements on what caused the Civil War and whether it is an event worthy of honor or shame. Some residents believe it is a part of United States history no matter what while others do not see any reason to celebrate it at all.

Washington Post columnist Dennis Frye peeks into how Davis personified the American leader of the mid-19th century, saying the seceded states needed his experience as a politician and president. But Frye concludes Davis ultimately couldn’t control the advocates of states rights in his own confederacy of states.

New York Times columnist Adam Goodheart recounts in detail when Davis left the U.S. Senate to secede from the Union, depicting how one Southern senator after another rose to declaim his valedictory address. Goodheart illustrates how an ill Davis explained why his state seceded.

Jefferson Vs Lincoln

I wish I could attend this talk at the SD Lee Institute

President Abraham Lincoln will be the focus of a conference of historians in Charleston this weekend. The Stephen Dill Lee Institute is bringing a half dozen authors and historians in for “Lincoln vs. Jefferson: Opposing Visions of America” at the Francis Marion Hotel on Friday and Saturday.

“The conference will be a great history of the different economic and political philosophies of the two presidents,” said Brag Bowling, director of the Lee Institute. “Jefferson was a proponent of decentralized government, while Lincoln was for big government and high taxes. We will have some of the best scholars in the country to address the issue.”

The Stephen Dill Lee Institute — named for the Confederate general and Low country native — is something of a Confederate think-tank formed by the Sons of Confederate Veterans.

The conference is part of the Institute’s educational outreach and the public is invited to buy tickets for the entire weekend of events. Among the speakers:

–David Aiken, professor at The Citadel and College of Charleston, will speak Friday night on the burning of Columbia and bombardment of Charleston, as seen through the eyes of Southern novelist and historian William Gilmore Simms.

–Thomas Dilorenzo, a professor at Loyola University in Maryland and academic director for the Lee Institute, will talk on the 16th president. Dilorenzo, author of “The Real Lincoln,” is one of the best-known Lincoln critics in the country. He will speak on the differing economic policies of Lincoln and Thomas Jefferson.

–Walter D. Kennedy, a 2008 presidential candidate, will deliver the keynote address at Saturday night’s banquet. He has co-authored five books on Southern heritage. Kennedy will argue his case for who was the real Republican, Lincoln or Jefferson.
For a full list of speakers, go to http://www.stephendleeinstitute.com.

Registration for the conference is $150 per person, or $125 for members of the SCV.
The cost includes admission to all lectures, as well as all meals on Saturday as well as the banquet.

For more information, call 1-800-693-4943 or (804) 389-3620.